(The Hill) – The House select committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021 attack on the Capitol will hold a primetime hearing on Thursday as it seeks to bring its findings to the public.  

While many people have sat down with the committee voluntarily, it has also issued more than 100 subpoenas to lawmakers, internet and communications companies, Trump White House officials and others. 

That includes three politicians from Michigan.  

Here’s a list of who the committee has subpoenaed so far, and why the committee says their testimony was necessary. 

TRUMP FAMILY 

Kimberly Guilfoyle  

The fiancee of Trump’s son, Donald Trump Jr., Guilfoyle spoke at the Jan. 6 rally on the Ellipse. After the rally, where former President Trump also spoke, a mob of Trump’s supporters marched to the Capitol, which was later invaded.  

Lawmakers certifying the results of the 2020 election were evacuated as the effort was suspended. It was resumed after the building was cleared. 

Guilfoyle is the only member of Trump’s family known to have received a subpoena directly, but multiple members have cooperated with the committee voluntarily, including Ivanka Trump, the president’s daughter, her husband, Jared Kushner, and Donald Trump Jr. The committee has also reportedly subpoenaed Eric Trump’s phone records. 

MEMBERS OF CONGRESS 

Rep. Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.) 

Biggs’ lawyers last week requested additional information on the “rationale” for the subpoena.  

Rep. Mo Brooks (R-Ala.) 

Brooks spoke at the Jan. 6 rally on the Ellipse. Brooks said last month that he would refuse to testify if it was in private or before his Senate primary runoff election later this month. 

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio) 

Jordan demanded the panel turn over the bulk of the information it has collected on him as he weighs how to respond. The committee responded by extending his subpoena deadline and laid out eight topics of its inquiry, including efforts by Jordan to reach then-Attorney General William Barr the day before the 2020 election. 

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) 

McCarthy responded to his subpoena by questioning the panel’s legitimacy late last month. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) had rejected two of McCarthy’s initial picks for the committee. The panel has taken interest in conversations between McCarthy and Trump surrounding the attack. McCarthy has said in press interviews on Jan. 6 and after that he had talked to Trump and asked him to speak to the public to stop the attack. 

Rep. Scott Perry (R-Pa.) 

Perry, the chairman of the Freedom Caucus, is slated to meet with Trump on Tuesday with other members of the caucus as the committee’s prime-time hearings approach. 

WHITE HOUSE, ADMINISTRATION OFFICIALS 

Jeffrey Clark 

Clark the former acting civil division assistant attorney general, reportedly floated an idea for the Justice Department to send letters to state legislators proposing they postpone their election certifications while the Justice Department hosts a press conference to declare it was looking into claims of voter fraud. 

Judd Deeredeputy White House press secretary

Cassidy Hutchinson 

Special assistant to the president for legislative affairs who reportedly accompanied Trump to the rally at the Ellipse 

Keith Kellogg 

Former Vice President Pence’s national security adviser 

Kenneth Klukowski 

Senior counsel in the division led by Trump DOJ official Jeffrey Clark 

Christopher Liddell 

White House deputy chief of staff who was reportedly at the White House on Jan. 6 

Nicholas Luna 

Trump’s personal assistant who was reportedly present in the Oval Office the morning of Jan. 6 

Kayleigh McEnany, White House press secretary 

John McEntee, White House personnel director 

Mark Meadows 

The former White House chief of staff provided thousands of documents to the committee before he stopped cooperating. The panel held him in contempt of Congress last December, but the Department of Justice has indicated in recent days it will not charge Meadows. 

Molly Michael, special assistant to the president and Oval Office operations coordinator 

Max Miller  

Former White House staffer who served on both of Trump’s presidential campaigns. Miller won a GOP primary for a House seat in Ohio last month. 

Stephen Miller  

The former White House senior adviser played a major role in many of Trump’s policies on the border and immigration.  

Peter Navarro 

Navarro, a White House trade adviser under Trump, filed a lawsuit last week against the committee and the Department of Justice after revealing he received a separate grand jury subpoena by the U.S. attorney for D.C. 

Kash Patel, chief of staff to acting Defense Secretary Christopher Miller. 

Robert “Bobby” Peede Jr. 

Peede reportedly met with Trump in his private dining room on Jan. 4 to discuss plans for the Ellipse rally. 

Daniel Scavino 

Congress voted to hold Scavino, the White House deputy chief of staff for communications, in contempt in April, but the Department of Justice has indicated in recent days it will not charge him. 

Marc Short  

Pence’s chief of staff reportedly warned Pence’s head Secret Service agent on Jan. 5 about concerns for the vice president’s safety as his relationship with Trump soured over the election. 

Ben Williamson, deputy assistant to the president and senior adviser to Meadows, Trump’s chief of staff 

Brian Jack, White House director of political affairs 

CAMPAIGN OFFICIALS, TRUMP ALLIES 

Stephen Bannon 

Bannon, the White House chief strategist and senior counselor to Trump for the first seven months of his presidency, defied the committee’s subpoena and was indicted in November. He is expected to go on trial this summer. 

Gary Michael Brown, Trump campaign deputy director of election day operations 

John Eastman 

Eastman is a conservative lawyer who served as a key legal adviser to Trump. He crafted two memos outlining a strategy to contest the election, including one that included Pence bucking his ceremonial duty to certify the election results. Pence ultimately refused to execute the strategy. 

Jenna Ellis 

Ellis, a Trump campaign attorney, publicly promoted assertions that the election was stolen alongside Sidney Powell and other legal advisers. 

Boris Epshteyn, Trump campaign strategic adviser 

Michael Flynn 

The former Trump national security adviser was reportedly present at an Oval Office meeting on Dec. 18, 2020 about the seizure of voting machines. 

Rudy Giuliani 

Trump’s personal lawyer became a central figure in the former president’s efforts to overturn the election. Giuliani reportedly sat with the committee for a virtual interview that lasted more than nine hours last month. 

Angela McCallum, Trump campaign national executive assistant 

Jason Miller, Trump campaign senior adviser 

Sidney Powell 

Powell was a member of Trump’s legal team. The committee cited Powell’s effort to tell Trump to seize voting machines as reason for its subpoena. Powell independently filed election-related lawsuits and lost legal battles across four states.  In Michigan, one judge dismissed her case as frivolous. 

Michael A. Roman, Trump campaign director of election day operations  

William Stepien, Trump campaign manager 

TIED TO JAN. 6 RIOT 

Proud Boys International, LLC 

A far-right group accused of calling for violence ahead of the attack on the Capitol. Dozens of the group’s members have been indicted in connection with the storming of the Capitol. Prosecutors charged five Proud Boys leaders with seditious conspiracy on Monday. 

Patrick Casey 

Leader of the the alt-right “America First” or “Groyper” movement subpoenaed for being at the Capitol on Jan. 6. 

Nicholas J. Fuentes 

Leader of the the alt-right “America First” or “Groyper” movement subpoenaed for being at the Capitol on Jan. 6. 

Oath Keepers 

A far-right group accused of helping plan and participate in the attack on the U.S. Capitol. More than a dozen members have been indicted in connection with the storming of the Capitol. 

Elmer Stewart Rhodes, president of the Oath Keepers 

Henry “Enrique” Tarrio 

The chairman of the Proud Boys was not in D.C. on Jan. 6 but is accused of helping the group prepare for the events that unfolded at the Capitol. 

RALLY AND EVENT ORGANIZERS 

The panel has taken interest in the planning for the Jan. 6 rally on the Ellipse and other scheduled demonstrations that preceded the Capitol riot. The subpoenas include individuals connected to a group called Women for America First, which hosted the Ellipse rally.  

The committee also demanded information from people connected to “Stop the Steal,” with one organizer having said the group intended to direct Ellipse rally attendees at the event’s conclusion to a separate, permitted event on Capitol grounds, advertised as the “One Nation Under God” rally. 

Ali Alexander, Stop the Steal organizer  

Lyndon Brentnall 

Listed on a permit for the Jan. 6 Ellipse rally as its “on-site supervisor” tied to a private security firm. 

Taylor Budowich 

Reportedly managed an advertising campaign for the Jan. 6 Ellipse rally and now serves as a Trump spokesperson. Budowich sued the committee, seeking to block his bank records from the panel even as he said he was cooperating. A federal judge rejected the effort in January. 

Justin Caporale 

Listed on a permit for the Jan. 6 Ellipse rally as its “project manager” 

Cynthia Chafian 

Submitted the Jan. 6 Ellipse rally permit on behalf of Women for America First 

Kimberly Fletcher 

Founder of Moms for America, a group that planned rallies on Jan. 5 and Jan. 6 in D.C. 

Alex Jones 

Founder of InfoWars who attended the Ellipse rally. Jones, who has said he was told by the White House he would lead a march from the rally to the Capitol, has claimed he invoked the Fifth Amendment almost 100 times during his testimony. 

Amy Kremer, Co-founder of Women for America First 

Kylie Kremer, Co-founder of Women for America First 

Jennifer Lawrence 

Reportedly assisted Women for America First in planning rallies leading up to the Capitol attack 

Bryan Lewis  

Listed on the “One Nation Under God” rally permit scheduled for outside the Capitol on Jan. 6 

Robert Patrick Lewis 

Chair of the 1st Amendment Praetorian, which provided security at multiple events leading up to Jan. 6 

Ed Martin, Stop the Steal organizer  

Nathan Martin 

Listed on the “One Nation Under God” rally permit scheduled for outside the Capitol on Jan. 6 

Maggie Mulvaney 

Listed on a permit for the Jan. 6 Ellipse rally as its “VIP lead” 

Katrina Pierson 

Former Trump spokesperson who assisted Women for America First 

Megan Powers 

Listed on a permit for the Jan. 6 Ellipse rally as its “operations manager for scheduling and guidance” 

Arthur Schwartz 

Republican strategist who reportedly communicated with Kimberley Guilfoyle and Donald Trump Jr. about the Ellipse rally 

Stop the Steal LLC 

Right-wing organization tied to a permit for a Jan. 6 rally on Capitol grounds 

Duston Stockton 

Assisted Women for America First in planning rallies leading up to the Capitol attack 

Hannah Salem Stone 

Listed on a permit for the Jan. 6 Ellipse rally as its “operations manager for logistics and communications” 

Roger Stone 

Republican operative who reportedly spoke at a Jan. 5 rally and used Oath Keepers members who were involved in the Capitol attack as personal security guards 

Andy Surabian 

Republican strategist who reportedly communicated with Kimberley Guilfoyle and Donald Trump Jr. about the Ellipse rally 

Tim Unes 

Listed on a permit for the Jan. 6 Ellipse rally as its “stage manager” 

Ross Worthington 

Former Trump White House official who helped draft the former president’s speech on the Ellipse 

Caroline Wren  

Listed on a permit for the Jan. 6 Ellipse rally as its “VIP advisor” 

TIED TO EFFORTS TO OVERTURN THE ELECTION 

The committee has subpoenaed a range of people involved in efforts to send slates of fake alternate electors to disrupt the certification of the election in Congress. Each state involved in the scheme had indicated a chair and secretary on the slates. 

Bill Bachenberg, Pennsylvania chairperson on alternate slate of electors 

Kathy Berden, Michigan chairperson on alternate slate of electors 

Christina Bobb, One America News Network host 

Kenneth Chesebro 

Chesebro circulated a memo suggesting Pence recuse himself as the presiding officer on Jan. 6 

Nancy Cottle, Arizona chairperson on alternate slate of electors 

Laura Coxchair of the Michigan GOP 

James DeGraffenreid, Nevada secretary on alternate slate of electors 

Mark Finchem, Arizona state lawmaker.  

Finchem is running in the Arizona secretary of state GOP primary and was endorsed by Trump.

Katherine Friess 

Friess is a lawyer who was reportedly involved with the voting machine seizure campaign. She sued the panel to prevent them from obtaining her phone records, arguing it would violate attorney-client privilege. 

Andrew HittWisconsin chairperson on alternate slate of electors 

Bernard Kerik 

The former New York Police Department commissioner was reportedly involved in the Jan. 5 meeting at the Willard Hotel. 

Phill Kline, former Kansas attorney general 

Deborah W. Maestas, New Mexico secretary on alternate slate of electors 

Douglas V. Mastriano  

State lawmaker from Pennsylvania who helped arrange for an alternate slate of electors. Mastriano won the Pennsylvania governor GOP primary last month. 

Michael J. McDonald, Nevada chairperson on alternate slate of electors 

Cleta Mitchell  

Lawyer who helped the Trump campaign file a lawsuit challenging Georgia’s election results.  

Kurt Olsen 

Lawyer who reportedly spoke with Trump multiple times on Jan. 6. 

Lisa Patton, Pennsylvania secretary on alternate slate of electors 

Loraine B. Pellegrino, Arizona secretary on alternate slate of electors 

Jewll Powdrell, New Mexico chairperson on alternate slate of electors 

Mayra Rodriguez, Michigan secretary on alternate slate of electors 

Kelly Ruh, Wisconsin secretary on alternate slate of electors 

David Shafer, Georgia chairperson on alternate slate of electors 

Shawn Still, Georgia secretary on alternate slate of electors 

Phil Waldron 

Waldron circulated a PowerPoint laying out the Trump campaign’s plans for contesting the 2020 election. 


Kelli Ward 

The chair of the Arizona Republican Party sued the panel after she was subpoenaed. 

COMPANIES 

The committee has subpoenaed multiple companies as part of its investigation, primarily seeking to examine the use of social media in organizing the Jan. 6 attack. 

Alphabet 

Parent company of YouTube, where users relayed communications about the Jan. 6 attack 

Telecom carriers 

The committee reportedly subpoenaed phone records for more than 100 people. 

Meta  

Parent company of Facebook, where users relayed communications about the Jan. 6 attack 

Reddit 

Platform where users relayed communications about the Jan. 6 attack 

Salesforce.com 

Provided services to Trump’s reelection campaign and the Republican National Committee 

Twitter 

Platform where users relayed communications about the Jan. 6 attack