Honoring those who served by observing Memorial Day

National

A member of the 3rd U.S. Infantry Regiment also known as The Old Guard, wears a face mask as he places flags in front of each headstone for “Flags-In” at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va., Thursday, May 21, 2020, to honor the Nation’s fallen military heroes ahead of Memorial Day. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

ALBANY, N.Y. (CNN) — Millions of people across the U.S. are observing Memorial Day on Monday.

While it’s considered the unofficial start of summer, the last Monday in May is first and foremost a day to honor those who died while serving in the U.S. armed forces.

It started as “Decoration Day” after the Civil War, but eventually became “Memorial Day.” It became a federal holiday by an Act of Congress in 1968.

Traditional ceremonies and events on the National Mall are not taking place this year, to protect against coronavirus.

However, the National Park Service and its partners at the veterans and service memorials will host virtual and online events.

Copyright 2020 Nexstar Broadcasting, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

StormTracker 6 Radar